The Finees: Good Stewardship Environmental Stewardship Award

Guidelines and Criteria (in various areas) for Nominations

Purpose: To recognize individuals, families, and businesses for extraordinary contributions and activities that have made a significant impact on the conservation, protection, and stewardship of the San Juan Archipelago through on-the-ground actions or management of private lands and/or businesses.

As of 2017 we have eliminated the “categories” for awards, but the nominating criteria still applies.  Please read on!

Who May Nominate: Anyone who is familiar with the individual, landowner or business may nominate; individuals/families and businesses may also self-nominate. Members of Conservation Summit Steering Committee cannot submit nominations.

Eligible Recipients: Any individual, family, or business whose place of residence or commerce is based in the islands of San Juan County. Federal, state, county, special district, municipal government, and non-profit agencies are not eligible, with the exception of public school educators.

 Important Dates to Remember

Annual Nomination Deadline: March 1st

Winners Notified:  By Stewardship Network

Winners Honored Publicly: On or around Earth Day (April 22nd )

Selection Criteria

This list was developed primarily to aid the Steering Committee in making its selection. When making your nomination, we ask that you consider the following criteria (this is not meant to be a comprehensive list, but a set of guiding principles). Your nomination does not have to incorporate all of these criteria; indeed, there may be other criteria not listed that are just as important, so be sure to include those suggestions on your nomination form.

Land Stewardship Criteria

Land is privately owned

Any size parcel is eligible; includes a forested portion (either conifer or deciduous).

Landowner has made improvements/alterations to land using Low Impact Development techniques; including, but not limited to: vegetated roofs, rain gardens, bio swales, pervious pavement, green/sustainable building, soil conservation

Landowner practices active water conservation (water-saving appliances, rain catchment, etc.)

Landowner promotes forest health through low-impact forestry techniques

Landowner conserves native plants in maintaining property or has been actively planting native species; noxious weeds are actively removed or not present; property contains rare plant species

Landowner has kept snags and downed logs in place to promote wildlife habitat

Landowner uses alternative energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal)

Landowner has wetland and riparian management zones that exceed forest practices minimums

Portion of land has old growth forest (conifer or deciduous) that landowner is actively maintaining/protecting

Landowner has land conserved in perpetuity through a conservation easement or has donated a portion of their property for conservation purposes.

Landowner works progressively with neighbors or nearby landowners to encourage similar practices

Waterfront Land Stewardship Criteria

Any size parcel is eligible; parcel includes shoreline (high or low-bank waterfront) portion

Landowner has made improvements/alterations to land using Low Impact Development techniques; including, but not limited to: vegetated roofs, rain gardens, bio swales, pervious pavement, green/sustainable building, soil conservation

Landowner practices active water conservation (water-saving appliances, rain catchment, etc.)

Shoreline portion is unfettered by docks, bulkheads or other alterations and remains in close to natural state

Structures are within setback guidelines

Feeder bluffs are allowed to replenish sediments and create new habitat\

Property stormwater drainage is channeled/contained properly

Landowner conserves native plants in maintaining property or has been actively planting native species; noxious weeds are actively removed or not present; property contains rare plant species

Landowner uses alternative energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal, micro-hydro)

If shoreline contains forage fish spawning habitat, landowner has taken steps to maintain or restore the tidelands and/or has been cooperative in local research and/or restoration efforts

Landowner has land conserved in perpetuity through a conservation easement or has donated a portion of their property for conservation purposes.

Landowner works progressively with neighbors or nearby landowners to encourage similar practices

Landowner monitors effectiveness of on-site sewage system and makes repairs or improvements as necessary.

Farmland Stewardship Criteria

Land is privately owned

Any size parcel is eligible; portion of property should be actively farmed or contain livestock

Property must be part of San Juan County’s Open Space-Ag designation

Landowner has made improvements/alterations to land using Low Impact Development techniques; including, but not limited to: vegetated roofs, rain gardens, bio swales, pervious pavement, green/sustainable building, soil conservation

Landowner practices active water conservation (water-saving appliances, rain catchment, etc in home, irrigation (if used) integrates drip irrigation)

Landowner practices any of the following sustainable farming techniques:

Rotational, planned grazing

Nutrient management (mgmt. of manures, crop residual, use of compost)

Multi-cropping/companion planting

Edge buffers maintained for wildlife

Riparian habitats protected, integrated into whole farm plan

Cover cropping or ground cover maintained

Irrigation (if used) integrates drip irrigation for water conservation

Landowner conserves native plants in maintaining property or has been actively planting native species; noxious weeds are actively removed or not present; property contains rare plant species

Landowner contributes to wildlife habitat by providing wildlife corridors through farmed portion of property, maintaining snags or brush piles, or has left portion of property in wild and unaltered state

Landowner uses alternative energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal, recycling, biofuels)

Crops support local food system and agricultural production

Landowner has excluded livestock from ecologically sensitive areas (wetlands, riparian areas, timberland).

Landowner has program in place to manage livestock waste

Landowner has land conserved in perpetuity through a conservation easement or has donated a portion of their property for conservation purposes.

Landowner works progressively with neighbors or nearby landowners to encourage similar practices or is active in local agricultural issues

Landowner uses conservation technical assistance

Landowner participates in local conservation/and/or farming organizations, or opens farms for tours by the public.

Village Stewardship Criteria

Land is privately owned and located in the Townships or villages of Friday Harbor, Roche Harbor, Eastsound, Olga, Deer Harbor, Orcas, West Sound, or Lopez Village

Parcels less than 1 acre in size are eligible

Landowner has made improvements/alterations to land using Low Impact Development techniques; including, but not limited to: vegetated roofs, rain gardens, bio swales, pervious pavement, green/sustainable building, soil conservation

Landowner practices active water conservation (water-saving appliances, rain catchment, etc)

Landowner conserves native plants in maintaining property or has been actively planting native species; noxious weeds are actively removed or not present; property contains rare plant species

Landowner uses alternative energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal, micro-hydro)

Landowner has created wildlife habitat on their property by any of the following practices: maintaining brush piles, placing bird nest boxes or bat roosts, providing year-round source of fresh water, maintaining snags, planting or maintaining native seed/berry/nut producing trees or shrubs, or has left a portion of their property in a wild/untended state

Landowner works progressively with neighbors or nearby landowners to encourage similar practices

Business Stewardship Criteria

Place of business must be registered and occur within the islands of San Juan County

Business must be open for at least 1 year

Business diverts waste products through reuse, recycling, composting, or other processes.

Business practices energy and water conservation techniques

Business sells/promotes environmentally-sensitive products, processes, and lifestyle choices.

Business is within pedestrian/bicycle access of ferry terminals

Avoid polystyrene(styrofoam), plastic bags,  minimize packaging, and use recycled or biodegradable supplies.

Business owner takes active role in encouraging similar practices

Business supports local economy by purchasing/selling local goods

Minimizes use of toxins such as solvents, fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, oil-based paints, and corrosives, and participates in annual hazardous waste “roundups”

Business supports local conservation efforts, marine stewardship and clean water practices; continually strives to improve in areas of environmental sustainability

Individual Stewardship Criteria

Individual must be a full-time resident of the any part of the islands of San Juan County

Employees of federal, state, county, special district, municipal government, and non-profit agencies are not eligible (with the exception of educators)

Activities performed by individuals should not be something already prescribed, or required by someone’s job

Individual has played an active role in conservation-related activities through volunteer and community work

Individual has made significant contribution to community’s awareness of environmental issues

Individual “practices what he/she preaches” through green living practices

Individual has shown superior leadership, skill, persistence or creativity in developing and implementing an environmental program or resolving a controversial environmental matter.

Individual has helped create, protect, and/or care for a special place in their community.

Youth Stewardship Criteria

Youth must be a resident of San Juan County, and under the age of 18.

Stewardship award is open to all age groups; K-12 Nominations for this award can be made by the students themselves, a family member or friend, a teacher, or other members of the community.

If student was involved in a teacher-led project, student demonstrated leadership and initiative in the administration of the project and facilitated involvement of his/her peers

If student developed their own project, student demonstrated leadership in the design, coordination, and implementation of the project.

Student displayed depth of knowledge of conservation subject

Student’s project (whether self-directed or not) has had a positive environmental impact on the local community with visible long-term benefits

Student is actively involved in extra-curricular activities that protect the environment (e.g., volunteering or raising funds for local environmental causes).

Educator Stewardship Criteria

Open to any educator teaching full or part-time in the public, private, or home-school system in San Juan County.

Educators at all grade levels (K-12) are eligible.

Teacher was personally responsible for developing a conservation education project to be implemented in the classroom.

Teacher was personally responsible for creating a conservation education project to be implemented outside the classroom

Teacher consistently weaves a conservation ethic in their teaching curricula.

Teacher practices responsible conservation ethic within classroom (recycling, energy conservation) and encourages students to do the same

Teachers project/program extends beyond classroom to benefit other classes, the school district, or the greater community.